ISSN 1542-3123

Lyric Recovery 3/22 at
Carnegie's Weill Hall
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the rivers of it, abridged
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Jan '04
'What We Have'



Nov '03
Intermediating Surfaces



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Personal Faith,
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Map of Vienna (1683)



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Cedar Chair by Romancing the Woods


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Live Performances/Recording Sessions/Radio Broadcasts

Watch for the print version release of
Big City Lit's Brightest Lights collection for 2003.

Mon., March 22, 2:00 p.m. The 2004 Lyric Recovery Festival essayist Alfred Corn and 1999 LyR Award winner George Dickerson appeared on WBAI 99.5 FM (a Pacifica station) to talk about the lyric with host Janet Coleman.

Mon., March 22, 7:30 p.m.
 Lyric Recovery Festival™, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall
Lucie Brock-Broido featured, Alfred Corn delivered a new essay, "The Allegorical Habit in Contemporary Poetry," and judge Glyn Maxwell's six finalist selections were read. First prize went to Deirdre Hare Jacobson for "Meeting of the Famished," second prize to Gabrielle LeMay for "Tango," and third to Stephen Bluestone for "The Crossing." [LyricRecovery.org] Most of the semifinalists selected at Poets House on February 21 were in the audience. The LyR 2004 anthology, Integrity of the Fragment, will appear from Headwaters Press.

Summer: Big City Lit collaborates with The Author's Watermark (Medusa) to continue its writers series at Conkling Hall in Rensselaerville (Rte. 85, rural Albany Co.). This season's focus is "Art in Revolution," a convention we intend to turn on its ear, with Robert Klein Engler and others.

Call for submissions:
(Note: List is not restrictive nor preclusive of other themes.)

Dramatic Monologue (poetry: e.g. "My Last Dutchess"); Epigrams; Moving/Motion; Dust; Corridors; Insects; Cemeteries; Smoking; Infanticide; Montreal/Quebec (surtout francophone); Surrealism; Timepieces; Kites; Suicide; 'Lovesick'; Hands and Gloves; How the Other Half:  Rich vs. Poor; Wells; Windmills; and Small Town Wherewithal
(Bolding indicates features which are scheduled to appear very soon.)

Consult Submissions for guidelines, Masthead for editorial policy,
also Bridge City Lit and Big City, Little pages.
Please query first on articles over 750 words.


In This Issue:  March 2004

Poetry:
This month's feature is "First Green is Gold," with contributors Patricia Brody, Ian Kahn, Margaret Peters Schwed, and others. Our hand-picked Twelve 12 page features "Heart of the Dauphin," the voice of Marie Antoinette's 'smallest dolphin' by Dean Kostos.


Fiction/Short Prose:

Jordan Hoffman's "Notes on vames vOYce(s)" alters more than visual perception with a portrait of an artist (or six you may know—or be) in search of an underwriter for his model universe.

Special: Longer Draughts (held over)

Asakusa Park (Asakusa Kôen)
a new translation by Seiji M. Lippit of Akutagawa Ryûnosuke's 1927 scenario

Essays:
Vision on a Broad Land
by Patrick Henry
Davy said the [coast at Cromer] could be inspiring for any ordinary person, when the likes of Bones and myself were not here talking of art and mysticism and confusing and spoiling the honest, healing pleasure of the visit.

Highly Recommended:
"The Collapse of Globalization and the Rebirth of Nationalsm"
by John Ralston Saul in the Mar '03 issue of Harper's
Globalization has been asserted by its believers to be inevitable—an all-powerful god; a holy trinity of burgeoning markets, unsleeping technology, and borderless managers.  . . . If Globalization has seemed so seductive to societies built upon Greek and Judeo-Christian mythologies, perhaps the reason is this bizarre confusing of salvation, fatalism, and punishment.

Articles:
Schools
by Christopher A. Miller
(pending)

Reviews:

Veronica Golos's A Bell Buried Deep
by Amy Meckler
Through [Biblical] women's precise recounting of their own experiences of privilege and servitude, Golos confronts the contemporary issue of who has the right to speak, who has the power to define and describe.

Reformulating Forms: A Close Reading of Two Contemporary Indian Poets, as reviewed by Ravi Shankar
in Contemporary Poetry Review
[T]he very hybridity that constitutes the relationship between culture and tongue is sundry, testament to the vastness of India as a country and English as a language, and that there is commensurate innovation in poetry abroad as there is at home.

Series/Event Reviews:

Place Poems at La MaMa: Short on Poetry, Long on Music and Dance
This work may confirm Artaud's statement: "It has not been definitively proved that the language of words is the best possible language."

Other Arts:  Theatre
Lost at Sea
Paul Camillus reviews Sea of Tranquility
Various spiritually lost, white people (Is that politically correct?) have immigrated to the modern Mecca that is New Mexico, bringing an arkload of issues along.

Free Expression:
Streaming Liberalism: The New Air America's 24-Hour Majority Retort (See also, article from [ABC News]

"The Things They Wrote"
Wed., Aug. 6, 2003—I can say that I will be home by early February.  .  .  . I am definitely looking forward to being out of the military. It was good for what it did for me, I don't regret it, but it is time to go. I see the future holding a lot more deployments.  .  .  . I am proud to defend my country but I don't want to be defending it constantly for the next 10-15 years.
Capt. Pierre E. Piché, 29, of Starksboro, Vt. Captain Piché was killed on Nov. 15 when his helicopter crashed near Mosul.

Jumping the Ship of State: John Brady Kiesling, John Brown, and Ann Wright, One Year Later—from <"http://www.tompaine.com/feature2.cfm/ID/10161">Tom Paine.Common Sense

Legal Forum:

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's Duck-Blind Ruling on a Case of (False) First Impression—from The Nation

Print Series:

With thanks for all of your orders by email query, we now offer a convenient listing and order form. You may still inquire about any Headwaters Print Series or monograph you don't see listed here by writing to us. Query Monographs of work appearing in the popular Jun '01 Vietnam issue are now available again.
We are preparing Big City Lit's Brightest Lights collection for 2003.

Letters:

(The editors invite for publication well-written letters or speakeasy pieces on any topic of concern or interest to the magazine's readers. See Letters Page for length, language, and other details.)

~ . ~ The magazine is intended to be read in Palatino, and preferably in Netscape. ~ . ~
Note to contributors: To cite your work in the Archive,
indicate the month, e.g. Jun2001/contents/poetrydusk.html.



Rain of One Ocean
The LyR 2002 Carnegie Collection
Poetry (64 pp) $15 (7x8.5 full color cover)



Degrees of Apprenticeship:
Sarah Lawrence mfa Collection
Poetry (56 pp) or Prose (64 pp) $10 each (full color)



Distance from the Tree
poems on fathers (64 pp $10) (full color)
Dana Gioia, Alice Notley, D. Nurkse, James Ragan, Ron Price et al.




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